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Menard County Texas Courthouses

2021 June 27
by Jan Wilkinson

Menard County Texas Courthouses

Here is a compilation of the history of Menard County Texas courthouses.  Menard County Texas was created January 22, 1858, which is 163 years ago. 

Michel Branamour Menard (1805-1856)

Due to problems, Menard’s citizens didn’t elect its officials until 1871.  The first meetings were held in a picket house at the corner of San Saba Street and Ellis Street.  A gas station later occupied the site. (Menard County Historical Society, 1982)

The second building used as a courthouse was a limestone commercial building in downtown Menard. It was designed by Patrick Henry “Paddy” Mires and built by B. Strom in 1880.  This building housed the Menard County courthouse and jail from 1880-86.  The first floor had Paddy’s store in front with the jail at the back.  The second floor, accessed only by an outside stairway on the west wall, was the courtroom.  The jail was reportedly a dungeon, in the building’s northwest corner, into which prisoners were lowered and from which they could not escape without a ladder.  Some members of the Commissioners Court felt that both the building itself and its location were insufficient for the county’s needs.  In February 1884, they discussed building a new courthouse and jail and, later that year, sold the second courthouse building to Fritz Luckenbach for $100.  Mr. Luckenbach used the building to start his hardware store, and substantial additions were made in the 1930s.  The original Mires building was converted and sold as a private residence. (Texas Courthouse Alliance; Menard County Historical Society, 1982)

P. H. “Paddy” Mires building

Recent photo of Mires building

The Commissioners Court ordered on May 13, 1884, that bonds be issued for the construction of a new courthouse and jail, and county residents responded by passing a $20,000 bond issue. The courthouse and jail were designed by architect T. P. Minor.  The construction firm, Vickery and Haynes of Kimble County submitted the lowest bid, $12,500, and was awarded the courthouse contract on May 12, 1885.   A separate builder Walker Mowath & Co., was used for the jail.  A public privy was also erected for $209 by Scruggs & Schuchard.

1886 Menard County Courthouse designed by Oscar Ruffini

The two-story stone courthouse, which featured a prominent central tower, was built on the current courthouse square near the canal. The similarly styled stone jail was at the southern end of the square, near the site of the current courthouse. The second jail, completed in June 1886, was freestanding, two-story limestone cube. It had castled turrets on each corner and crenelations on all four sides.  It was designed by Oscar Ruffini.

At that time, the north and south halves of the square were still separate blocks, divided by Canal Street.  As shown on the 1921 Sanborn map, the 1885 courthouse and jail both occupied the south block, with the north block reserved as open public space.

Sanborn Map Company, Aug 1921

Sanborn Fire Insurance Map from Menard, Menard County, Texas, Aug 1921

In the 1920s, Canal Street was closed between Tipton and Gay Streets, and the blocks were combined to form one lot, creating the long narrow square seen today.  As shown on the 1930 Sanborn map, Mission Street was also closed between Tipton and Gay Streets, along the southern boundary of the square.

1917 Menard County Home Guard in front of Menard County courthouse

 

 

1930 Popular Menard High School yearbook

1898 Menardville photo by N. H. Rose. Looking East with the irrigation ditch on the road to the Courthouse on the left and the Jail to the right and South.

 

Menardville looking West Courthouse and Jail noted on the photo, shared on Facebook

 

The facilities were used for forty-five years until 1931, when a new courthouse with a jail on the top floor was completed.  Both the 1885 courthouse and jail were razed when the new courthouse was built in 1931.  The stones from the old courthouse and jail were used to build the fence around the Pioneer Rest Cemetery in Menard.  The Works Progress Administration (WPA) provided the labor in 1933-34 to lay the stones for the fence, but the arch was added later. (Menard County Historical Society, 1982)

1931 New Menard Courthouse photo by F. L. Wilkinson

Menard County Courthouse Marker

The historical courthouse was build by Withers and Thompson; Porter, E.D.  The 1931 courthouse building is listed on the National Register of Historic Places, is designated a Recorded Texas Historic Landmark and a State Antiquities Landmark.

We are very thankful to County Judge Richard Cordes for working tirelessly and receiving two Texas Historic Courthouse Preservation Program grants from the Texas Historical Commission and seeing the completed renovations of the courthouse.

 

https://texasfortstrail.com/plan-your-adventure/historic-sites-and-cities/sites/menard-county-courthouse

Menard: Menard County Courthouse


Menard County, organized 1871, conducted its first county business in a house built of pickets before financing the construction of a more permanent, two-story limestone building designed by architect P. H. Mires. From 1880 to 1884, the limestone structure’s first floor housed a general store while the second functioned as the county’s courtroom. The building also included a dungeon, located in the northwest corner, which served as the county jail where prisoners were dropped and retrieved via a ladder.

In 1884, the Menard County commissioners court ordered bonds issued to finance a new courthouse and jail, designed by architect T. P. Minor and completed in 1886. This stone, two-story courthouse served the county for over thirty years. By the late 1920s, however, its conditions were deteriorating. According to the local Menard Messenger, the vault space had become inadequate to hold all the county records, bats were prevalent, wind penetrated the courthouse through the windows and cupola, and there were holes in the district courtroom floor.

Despite a citizen-led campaign to preserve the historic courthouse, the structure and a nearby jail were demolished to make room for a more modern courthouse. Many of the buildings’ stones were recycled, however, and used to build the fence around the Pioneer Rest Cemetery with help from labor courtesy of the Works Progress Administration.

The new courthouse, completed in 1932, was designed by Elmer George Withers, principle architect of the Fort Worth-based firm Withers & Thompson. Withers was born in Caddo Peak, Texas, developing a career as architect through apprenticeships and correspondence courses. He was responsible for several other Texas county courthouse designs as well as the Art Deco courthouse he created for Menard County.

Withers’ Menard County courthouse is located along the south end of a long, narrow square in Menard, the county seat established along the San Saba River. The building’s one-story front section steps back to a central, four-story design flanked by two-story wings. The structural clay tile walls are sheathed in multiple shades of brick and decorated with cast stone detailing. A jail was originally located on the top floor and the building includes a basement featuring an individual jail cell used for prisoners too drunk or combative to get up all four flights of stairs. Long after the jail was relocated to another building, a python escaped from a traveling animal handler who was set up on the courthouse square during the Jim Bowie Days Festival. The snake made its home in the basement holding cell for several years before it was removed by several deputies prior to the restoration work in 2000.

Although the general design of the courthouse functions as planned, the architect or builder apparently miscalculated the placement of the judge’s bench, witness stand, and jury box in the District courtroom, an issue addressed both soon after completion and once again when a complete restoration of the courthouse began in 2000. Apparently, the judge’s bench and witness box were placed in an awkward position, preventing the judge and a portion of the jury to see the face of the witness during questioning. Instead, they could only see the back of the witness’s head, creating grounds for “reversible error”, a term used to define circumstances resulting in an unfair trial. Soon after the courthouse was completed, the courtroom layout was modified to correct this oversight. During the restoration process, financed by the Texas Historic Courthouse Preservation Program, the decision was made not to return the courtroom layout to its original design, thereby avoiding the possibility of creating a “reversible error”, grounds for a mistrial still on the books today.

 

Another photo trip in the pasture in Real County, Texas

2021 May 29
by Jan Wilkinson

Today, May 27, 2021, I had a nice slow drive in my Ranger behind a Dozer and skid-steer Bobcat headed to the back of our ranch to start work replacing a fence.  I was the ride home, but could take my time getting there, so took some photos of what we see driving down the roads.  We have flint and fossils everywhere and the lichen is different on each rock.  Enjoy!

Looking West and headed to the top on the far left side, two pastures away.

 

Thrilled when I find Wavy Scaly Cloakfern

 

PTERIDACEAE Maidenhair Fern Family Astrolepis sinuata Wavy Scaly Cloakfern

 

PTERIDACEAE Maidenhair Fern Family Astrolepis sinuata Wavy Scaly Cloakfern

 

Can you find the Wavy Scaly Cloakfern?

Afternoon photos Real County Texas

2021 May 23
by Jan Wilkinson

We are blessed to live in Real County, Texas on the original ranch first owned by my great grandfather, Alexander Kennedy Auld in the 1870’s. The headquarters are on the top of the Divide on the West side of US Highway 83 where the water shed flows to the West Prong of the Frio River. Here are a few photos from our pasture taken today. Hope you enjoy! Click to enlarge any photo.

We live next to a Buffalo wallow and there are many flint quarries in various places in the pastures of the ranch. Click to enlarge and you can see the flint and fossil rocks.

We live next to a Buffalo wallow and there are many flint quarries in various places in the pastures of the ranch. Click to enlarge and you can see the flint and fossil rocks.

Painting of San Sabá Mission in Menard Texas

2021 May 22
by Jan Wilkinson

Click to enlarge

There is a famous oil on canvas painting that is 6 feet 11 inches X 9 feet 7 inches, “The Franciscan Mission of San Saba in the Province of Texas” (circa 1758).  It is known as one of the earliest Texas historical scene paintings still in existence, it is also called “The Destruction of the Mission San Saba.”  The mural painted in 1765 details the destruction of Mission Santa Cruz de San Saba (which occurred in 1758). The mural was commissioned by Pedro Romero de Terreros, who had sponsored the mission and whose cousin died in the attack. The unsigned mural is attributed to José de Páez.  It was titled “The Destruction of Mission San Sabá in the Province of Texas and the Martyrdom of the Fathers Alonso de Terreros, Joseph Santiesteban” and now hangs in the Instituto Nacional de Antropología y Historia in Mexico City.  Menard County owns a copy of this painting and can be seen at the Menard County Library and the Menard County Courthouse, today, May 23, 2021.

Using numbered references, it illustrates the story of the area and mission destruction.  The painting was on display in 2018 during the San Antonio 300 year celebration and had the attached documentation.  The painting was also in Texas in the late 1980’s and offered for sale when it was removed back to Mexico by customs where it resides today, May 2021.  Come to see the historic Presidio de San Saba in Menard, Texas.

April 10, 2018, San Antonio 300 art event with original oil painting of the Destruction of the Mission San Saba, photo by Buddy Wilkinson

San Saba Mission Painting

San Saba Mission Painting.The Destruction of Mission San Sabá in the Province of Texas and the Martyrdom of the Fathers Alonso Giraldo de Terreros, Joseph Santiesteban, a huge (83″ by 115″) painting, was commissioned around 1762 by mining magnate Pedro Romero de Terreros, cousin of Father Alonso de Terreros and principal benefactor of Santa Cruz de San Sabá Mission. Its intent was to express both the horror and significance of the massacre as well as to honor the priests’ martyrdom. Speculations about the identity of the painter have ranged from indefiniteness to dogmatic certainty. Whoever he was, the artist likely worked in the studio of Miguel Cabrera, the dominant painter of mid-eighteenth-century Mexico. A great deal of evidence suggests but does not prove conclusively that one of Cabrera’s artists, José de Páez, executed the painting.

In The Destruction of Mission San Sabá, the placement of the figures of the two slain priests makes their deaths the window through which the viewer interprets the painting on both the actual and figurative level, since these deaths were what invested the massacre with the element of heroic sacrifice. At the foot of each of these large figures is a shield bearing a biographical sketch of the priest, who is depicted in the manner in which he died, complete with weapons and blood in appropriate places. In addition to biographical information, the shields commend the priests’ character and sacrifice. The shields bracket a scroll that briefly summarizes the purpose of the mission and praises its major financial supporter, “the illustrious Knight don Pedro Therreros of the order of Calatrava.” In the fashion of painters of other historical tableaus, the artist has placed an alphabetized key to the eighteen events depicted in the painting in the lower half of the scroll. These vignettes are illustrated by 300 separate figures, each incident marked by a large red letter.

The painting was the only such work executed in Mexico in the mid-1700s that attempted to document a contemporary historical event; the few other visual depictions of scenes from this period in the nation’s history are in the category of “historical views.” Just as most American painters of the time took their artistic cues from Great Britain and, to a lesser extent, continental Europe, so colonial Mexican painters followed European artistic precedents, which dictated that “history painting” refer to classical or biblical themes. If an artist wished to portray contemporary historical figures, he dressed them in classical garb and allegorized the incident in which they were involved. Traditionally, American art historians have pointed to Benjamin West’s Death of General Wolfe as the painting that started a “revolution” in historical painting toward realism in the portrayal of contemporary historical events (1770). Although The Destruction of Mission San Sabá did not have a similar influence, it was painted at approximately the same time and was one of the first historical paintings to portray its subjects in contemporary dress.

The painting is important primarily as an artifact, as the earliest known painting of a Texas historical scene by a professional artist. Its contents, however, are not intended as a historically reliable account of the attack. Comparison with the deposition of one of the survivors, Father Miguel Molina, indicates that the painter included many of the events mentioned by the priest, although the wording of the alphabetized key is not a literal transcription of his account. But the artist also omitted some events while embellishing others. Certainly, the painting has much to commend it as a piece of visual, documentary evidence of the battle, especially since it was executed shortly after the massacre and a survivor may have advised the artist. Nevertheless, The Destruction was intended primarily as hagiography, with history as a secondary consideration. The canvas was soon famous in Spain as well as Mexico and served beautifully as a piece of “contemporary propaganda and…current morality,” celebrated primarily for its ideological overtones rather than for its aesthetic or documentary qualities. In the 1990s it was located at the Instituto Nacional de Antropología y Historia in Mexico City.

Sam D. Ratcliffe, “Escenas de Martirio: Notes on the Destruction of Mission San Sabá,” Southwestern Historical Quarterly 94 (April 1991).

The following, adapted from the Chicago Manual of Style, 15th edition, is the preferred citation for this entry.

Sam D. Ratcliffe, “San Saba Mission Painting,” Handbook of Texas Online, accessed May 22, 2021, https://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/entries/san-saba-mission-painting.

Published by the Texas State Historical Association. Original Publication Date: January 1, 1996 Most Recent Revision Date: February 16, 2019

**************

 

2018 San Antonio Museum display of Painting

2018 San Antonio Museum display of Painting

Sale brochure before painting returned to Mexico

Sale brochure before painting returned to Mexico

Sale brochure before painting returned to Mexico

Photo close-up to original ca. 1765, New Spain, “Martyrdom of Franciscans at Mission San Saba”, Oil on Canvas by Jose de Paez, Museo Nacional de Arte, Secretaria de Cultura, INBA, MX, Mexico City

Photo close-up to original ca. 1765, New Spain, “Martyrdom of Franciscans at Mission San Saba”, Oil on Canvas by Jose de Paez, Museo Nacional de Arte, Secretaria de Cultura, INBA, MX, Mexico City

Photo close-up to original ca. 1765, New Spain, “Martyrdom of Franciscans at Mission San Saba”, Oil on Canvas by Jose de Paez, Museo Nacional de Arte, Secretaria de Cultura, INBA, MX, Mexico City

Photo close-up to original ca. 1765, New Spain, “Martyrdom of Franciscans at Mission San Saba”, Oil on Canvas by Jose de Paez, Museo Nacional de Arte, Secretaria de Cultura, INBA, MX, Mexico City

Photo close-up to original ca. 1765, New Spain, “Martyrdom of Franciscans at Mission San Saba”, Oil on Canvas by Jose de Paez, Museo Nacional de Arte, Secretaria de Cultura, INBA, MX, Mexico City

Photo close-up to original ca. 1765, New Spain, “Martyrdom of Franciscans at Mission San Saba”, Oil on Canvas by Jose de Paez, Museo Nacional de Arte, Secretaria de Cultura, INBA, MX, Mexico City

Photo close-up to original ca. 1765, New Spain, “Martyrdom of Franciscans at Mission San Saba”, Oil on Canvas by Jose de Paez, Museo Nacional de Arte, Secretaria de Cultura, INBA, MX, Mexico City

Harryman/Bradford photos c1915-1925 Menard County, Texas

2021 March 16
by Jan Wilkinson

I scanned a 28 page little black photo album that belonged to Laura Forrest Harryman Bradford. The photos are not labeled but are such a wonderful look at a time during the early years of circa 1915-1925 in Menard County, Texas.  I am hoping someone will be able to help identify some of these folks.

My husband’s maternal grandmother was Laura Forrest Harryman who married George H. Bradford on January 29, 1921 in Menard County, Texas.  Mamo, as she was called, was born in Weesatche, Goliad County, Texas on October 2, 1895.  She moved to Menard with her family between 1900 and 1910.  When she married George, Dado, as he was called, Mamo was 25 years old.  She was 31 in 1926 when she had Laverne Bradford, who marries Francis Lamar Wilkinson in 1946, and then Laverne got polio and with three years of daily therapy Mamo kept her from being crippled.  When Mamo turned 40, she had Georgia in 1935.  Mamo and Dado were married for 59 years and had a long and wonderful life until Dado died at the age of 82 in 1980.  Mamo lived many years at the Menard Manor after a debilitating stroke and died March 8, 1988 at the age of 92.  You can read more about her family at the post: https://blog.wilkinsonranch.com/2017/07/08/pate-and-martindale-family-photos/

 

Laura Forrest and her younger sister, Ruby Bernice Harryman, unknown date but circa 1917 when Ruby married from photo collection of Penny Wade, Ruby’s granddaughter.

 

Forrest Harryman with George Bradford and friend on the bank of the San Saba River, unknown date

 

1920 Laura Forrest Harryman at Charlie Graham Store Menard from family collection

 

1920 Laura Forrest Harryman at Charlie Graham Store Menard from family collection

 

1921 Forrest and George Bradford on the Bradford Ranch, Menard County, Texas from family collection

 

George H. “Dado” Bradford from family collection

 

Laura Forrest “Mamo” Harryman Bradford from family collection

 

********************Photos from Little Black Album

Young man with cap and cigarette with girl in plaid hat and scarf with Mamo with her six button sleeve dress and cap with white trim at the San Saba River

 

Unknown group of young people with “Mamo” Forrest Harryman on right side with hat Page 15 from Mamo’s album

 

Unknown group of young people with Forrest Harryman on bottom left side with hat Page 15 from Mamo’s album

 

Two young girls same group on side of hill Page 16 from Mamo’s album

 

Unidentified girl with hat and fox fur collar and boy with three piece suit Page 15 from Mamo’s album

 

Two young ladies dressed in black one with fur collar black hose and hats unknown Page 3 from Mamo’s album

 

Dado and Mamo with hound dogs and big tent on Bradford place west of town Page 7 from Mamo’s album

 

Believe to be Mamo along with another girl telephone operators in Menard

 

Wagon with two boys with cocked hats and two girls one with reins unknown Page 17 from Mamo’s album

 

Girl driving wagon with man with hat and others

 

Two ladies in white with bonnets and one drinking stem glass with two boys beside water well Page 16 from Mamo’s album

 

San Saba River baptism with wagons and cars and lots of folks in river Page 10 from Mamo’s album

 

Man with rope and girl in white with cap looking at sheep Page 8 from Mamo’s album

 

George “Dado” Bradford riding wagon horse with Mamo in round hat and gentleman and lady in bonnet with girl Page 8 from Mamo’s album

 

Two girls hugging boy with overalls happy faces unknown Page 10 from Mamo’s album

 

Blonde girl sitting side saddle on horse possibly Mamo Page 1 from Mamo’s album

 

Unknown family with three children Page 21 of Mamo’s album

 

Girl standing with her horse wearing pants and round tight hat Page 27 from Mamo’s album

 

Car with little blonde girl two young ladies and dog and Mamo with hat Page 17 from Mamo’s album

 

Family group on low water crossing bridge with George and Forrest and unknown couple and little girl

 

Family group on low water crossing bridge on San Saba River

 

Man sitting with little girl hand on shoulder with lady in plaid dress holding bonnet unknown Page 3 from Mamo’s album

 

Possibly Mamo and Dado with girl standing on the San Saba River bridge Page 17 from Mamo’s album

 

Two ladies with Mamo beside San Saba River all in other photos Page 14 from Mamo’s album

 

Young lady with lace collar sitting on San Saba riverbed by high bank and large tree Page 15 from Mamo’s album

 

Young lady with long satin dress with trimmed cuff and pin wearing tight hat with round balls sitting on San Saba riverbed Page 5 from Mamo’s album

 

Young couple on San Saba River bridge she has lace collar and ball fruit hanging off hat Page 18 from Mamo’s album

 

Two ladies sitting on San Saba riverbed same as other photo Page 17 from Mamo’s album

 

Girl and lady with lace collar sitting on train bridge Page 18 from Mamo’s album

 

Two young ladies dressed in black one with fur collar black hose and hats unknown Page 3 from Mamo’s album

 

Girl sitting on San Saba River bridge with stripes and emblem on sleeve round brim hat Page 14 from Mamo’s album

 

Mamo such a pretty girl with purse and short sleeves sitting on the San Saba River bank Page 9 from Mamo’s album

 

Mamo sitting on bank of river with black tight cap and white dress with short sleeves

 

Laughing girl sitting on San Saba River bank with fur tail in lap black dress with white stripes on sleeves and round brim hat Page 12 from Mamo’s album

 

Lady beside low water crossing with shed in back wearing black clothes and cap Page 14 from Mamo’s album

 

Lady standing beside low water crossing dressed in black with round straw hat Page 22 from Mamo’s album

 

Lady dressed in black with hat in hand two little girls on low water crossing of San Saba River Page 3 from Mamo’s album

 

Mamo dressed in black with lace collar in front of rose bushes and picket fence Page 10 from Mamo’s album

 

Unknown lady with black dress with satin trim and white lace collar by rose bushes Page 4 from Mamo’s album

 

Mamo with two ladies at Frisco Depot all wearing lace collars and hats Page 19 from Mamo’s album

 

Mamo sitting on ground with white lace collar Page 21 of Mamo’s album

 

Lady with black dress with satin trim and lace collar sitting on ground with little girl white dress Page 4 from Mamo’s album

 

Same little girl that was with lady with black dress with satin trim and lace collar sitting on ground Page 4 from Mamo’s album

 

Mamo with short dress holding round brim hat with lady in gingham dress and round hat by rose bush

 

Margaret Isabelle “Maggie Belle” Pate “Ma” Harryman dressed in black sitting on log with vehicle in back ground Page 8 from Mamo’s album

 

Flowers at graveside in Mamo’s album unsure grave

 

Ma Harryman with car and standing next to tree in black with fur collar Page 24 from Mamo’s album

 

Mamo standing next to car with Nora with short bangs in drivers seat and lady with bun long black dress sitting on running board unsure Page 25 from Mamo’s album

 

Believe to be Mamo with big button coat and black gloves by tree and car Page 17 from Mamo’s album

 

Mamo driving car same day as Ma Harryman in all in black Page 24 from Mamo’s album

 

Ruby with short bangs driving Page 24 from Mamo’s album

 

Mamo wearing big button jacket and tight cap with bow beside car and large dog Page 25 from Mamo’s album

 

Mamo with fur collar coat and hat with bow on side with black dog beside car unknown Page 3 from Mamo’s album

 

Possibly Mamo with fur collar and cap taken in yard Page 29 from Mamo’s album

 

Lady with fur collar coat and hat with bow on side with black dog was in photo beside car unknown Page 3 from Mamo’s album

Unknown married lady wedding ring dressed in black with fur collar and head wrap Page 1 from Mamo’s album

 

Unknown brown haired little girl in back yard with black leggings and dress Page 23 from Mamo’s album

 

Ruby Harryman Crowell sitting under tree with short bangs and curls Page 13 from Mamo’s album

 

Ruby Harryman Crowell with short bangs white dog beside fence with sticks Page 17 from Mamo’s album

 

Ruby with short bangs fur collar jacket with large buttons and two dogs Page 25 from Mamo’s album

 

Ma Harryman with girl Page 28 from Mamo’s album

 

Margaret Belle “Ma” Harryman unknown location

 

Two ladies and young man with lace collars beside train engine Page 18 from Mamo’s album

 

Mamo with two ladies looking out back of train with two lights all wearing white lace collars Page 19 from Mamo’s album

 

Frisco Engine with Mamo on the right with gentleman standing Page 6 from Mamo’s album

 

Unknown couple standing back of train Page 2 from Mamo’s album

 

Unknown man with hat holding hand of girl on train car with another girl oval window on car Page 18 from Mamo’s album

 

Unknown four on back of train two men and two women Leaving Menard for Panama-Pacific Exposition Page 6 from Mamo’s album (Held in San Francisco February 20 to December 4, 1915)

 

Unknown couple guy with wooly chaps and pistol and scarf and cigar, lady with cap on back of train Leaving Menard for Panama-Pacific Exposition Page 15 from Mamo’s album

 

Unknown girl beside car with rag top Page 11 from Mamo’s album

 

Believe to be Wade Crowell with Ruby on running board Mamo’s album 1

 

Unknown man standing on running board of truck

 

Man and girl holding turkeys on tree limb Page 7 from Mamo’s album

 

Young blonde boy with pipe sitting on water well with bucket maybe Harryman’s San Saba Avenue, Menard Page 2 from Mamo’s album

 

Young lady standing next to water well holding round hat in gingham dress Page 13 from Mamo’s album

 

Unknown lady in yard next to rose bush with round black hat with fur collar Page 23 from Mamo’s album

 

Girl in front of house with curved neck short sleeve dress unknown

 

Young girl holding hand of boy with cap and little girl Page 1 from Mamo’s album

 

Very small photo of lady with fur collar and large brim hat Page 8 from Mamo’s album

 

Unknown lady with fur collar and cap by wooden gate Page 29 from Mamo’s album

 

Unknown side view of girl standing by courthouse cross wooden fence Page 22 from Mamo’s album

 

Two unknown girls standing by courthouse cross wooden fence Page 22 from Mamo’s album

 

Two ladies sitting on bridge wearing round hats and short sleeved white dresses unknown Page 11 from Mamo’s album

Unknown man and lady beside house wearing hats and white lace collar Page 9 from Mamo’s album

 

Man driving old car with fringe on windows wearing bow tie unknown Page 11 from Mamo’s album

Unknown man wearing hat in front of picket fence Page 21 from Mamo’s album

 

Two ladies in front yard with hats unknown Page 9 from Mamo’s album

 

Unknown two young girls sitting with white dog and horse by shed in background Page 28 from Mamo’s album

 

Unknown very small photo of young man Page 27 from Mamo’s album